Lechazo en casa

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Made this inspired by our travels last week to Burgos to eat Lechazo. To be more precise it is a slow roasted shoulder of lamb and this version is not traditional as I added thinly sliced onions wine and herbs but it was delicious. Ate it with a rice stuffed tomato and green salad. With a cool glass of kozel beer. Yum!

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Daring Bakers November Challenge 2012: Twelve Days of Cookies

Holiday season is the time for sharing and Peta of Peta Eats is sharing a dozen cookies, some classics and some of her own, from all over the world with us.

The challenge recipe I chose to make was the chocolate sables, recipe here.  I left out the egg yolk as I had read some other recipes on the internet that did not use it, so I thought I’d see how it went.  The cookies were delicious, crumbly with big chunks of chocolate and not too sweet.  They even seemed to get better with time!  Try them crumbled up in vanilla ice cream for an excellent version of cookies and cream.

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As my second cookie, I made Alfajores, which are South American corn starch based cookies, filled with dulce de leche.  I used the recipe from familyfoodie.com, which have a little lemon zest as well as vanilla for flavour.  Dulce de Leche, whilst readily available in Spain is quite expensive, so I made my own using the oven method, which seems a lot safer than boiling sweet and condensed milk in a pan and is also much faster.  Simply pour a can of sweetened condensed milk with a sprinkle of salt into a pyrex tray and bake at about 180 degrees until golden brown (time varies with your oven-mine took about an hour but my oven is terrible).  When it is golden whisk it up to get rid of any lumps and leave to cool and set a little before using.

The cookies were lovely and crumbly, although very sweet and with a tendency to stick your mouth together!

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 This was an excellent challenge, Ill probably make a few more cookies before Christmas hits!!

Run rabbit, run rabbit, run, run, run

Our dear friend peter came to stay and we ate him! If you want a cheap delicious meal I suggest you do the same. It does involve some fairly full on butchery but i found it errrr fun,no not the right word, “interesting” .  Now I sound like a serial killer. If, like me, you enjoy doing the things most cookery books tell you to get your butcher to do then go for it.  If not , get your butcher to do it. Think they might tell you to stick it in Tescos though. I didn’t even ask in Carrefour, as it came sealed in a bag. Anyway where were we.

Here! What you must  do to the rabbit: cut it’s legs off and the head, cut out the liver and kidney, then remove the saddle from the backbone and rib cage, keeping it in one piece. What is the saddle? The bit where you would strap your saddle were you to attempt to ride your rabbit. The two loins that run down the backbone.

With the two loins in one piece but without bones, take the liver and kidney and lay them along the centre of the meat, season, roll up and tie with string at 3cm lengths, (I used the devilishly technical granny knot), you should end up with a weird sausage saddle thing, season it, wrap it in cling film and pop it in the fridge. Now you can eat that with some mash and something green.

To cook your sausage, take it out of the fridge 30mins before you are going to cook, brown it in a frying pan with some butter and oil, then pop it in the oven at 170 for 10-15mins.  Then rest it for at least 5mins in tin foil, before destringing.  Serve with mash, greens and any juices you managed to get from resting. That is phase one. Completed.

Phase two as seen in the photo is all the above, plus you make a cottage pie with the rabbit legs

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Rabbit cottage pie

Rest of rabbit including head and backbones.

1 large carrot diced

1 celery stalk diced

1 onion diced

4 garlic cloves peeled and split in half

100ml white wine vinegar

300ml white wine

1.25 litres of chicken stock

1 large tin of whole tomatoes drained then squished by hand.(i prefer to chopped but you can use chopped)

1 bay leaf

sprig rosemary

1 tablespoon chopped tarragon (I used half quantity of dried)

1 tablespoon chopped parsley

  1. In a casserole pan colour the rabbit pieces in a knob of butter with a splash of oil until golden. Remove and set aside.
  2. Colour the veg adding more butter and oil if needed.
  3. Return the rabbit to pan add the vinegar and reduce to almost nothing.
  4. Add the wine and reduce by 2/3
  5. Add the chicken stock, tomatoes, bay and rosemary.
  6. Bring to the boil skim and simmer gently for 2 hrs.
  7. Heat oven 170c
  8. Lift rabbit out and set aside, reduce stock to light sauce consistency.
  9. Strain the sauce reserving the veggies.
  10. Pick the meat from the bones and combine with the veggie,s  tarragon and parsley and a few tablespoons of the sauce in a lasagne dish.Taste and adjust the seasoning, drizzle with a little olive oil and cover with mash.
  11. Bake in the oven for 40 mins, enjoy.

This recipe is adapted from Antony Demetre’s excellent book “Today’s Special” recipes from Arbutus and Wild Honey.

Daring Bakers October Challenge: Mille Feuille

ImageOur October 2012 Daring Bakers’ challenge was hosted by Suz of Serenely Full. Suz challenged us to not only tackle buttery and flaky puff pastry, but then take it step further and create a sinfully delicious Mille Feuille dessert with it!

This was a tricky challenge for me, relying heavily on presentation and patience, neither of which are my strong points.  The first attempt was very tasty, but as I didn’t let it chill for long enough before cutting, it collapsed and needed to be eaten with a spoon! The second attempt stayed together much better and was delicious.

I made a traditional Mille Feuille with Creme Patiessere filling.

The puff pastry was really fun to make, although perhaps could have stayed in the oven a little longer for a crisper finish.  My feathering on top also needs a little work, and next time I would assemble right before serving so the pastry stayed a bit crisper.  However, it was delicious!  Great challenge!

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Daring Bakers Challenge June 2012: Battenberg Cake

Mandy of What The Fruitcake?! came to our rescue last minute to present us with the Battenberg Cake challenge! She highlighted Mary Berry’s techniques and recipes to allow us to create this unique little cake with ease.

I’m not really a fan of plain sponge cake or marzipan, so I decided to try and jazz the cakes up a little and used the chocolate plastique rather than marzipan for the covering.  For the cake I made a chocolate sponge and a cherry coconut sponge, sandwiched together with a chocolate ganache.

It was nice, but a little dry and although the chocolate plastique worked quite well as a covering, I didn’t really enjoy the taste, so next time would probably use a chocolate icing instead.

Chocolate Sponge cake and Cherry Coconut Sponge (based on Mary Berry’s Coffee Battenberg)

Ingredients
¾ cup  Unsalted Butter, softened & cut in cubes
¾ cup  Caster Sugar
1¼ cups Self-Raising Flour
3 Large Eggs, room temp
½ cup dessicated coconut
3/4 tsp / 3½ gm Baking Powder
3 tsp Milk
½ tspVanilla Extract

2 cups pitted cherries chopped
1½ tsp cocoa powder

 

Directions:
1. Preheat oven to moderate 180°C/160°C Fan Assisted
2. Grease an 8”/20cm square baking tin with butter
3. Line the tin with parchment paper, creating a divide in the middle with the parchment (or foil)

4.  Whisk together dry ingredients (except cocoa and coconut) and combine with the wet ingredients in a large bowl (except vanilla and milk) and beat together just until the ingredients are combined and the batter is smooth
6. Spoon half the mixture into a separate bowl and stir in the vanilla, 1½ teaspoons milk and cocoa
7. Spoon the cocoa mixture into the one side of the prepared baking tin
8. Add chopped cherries, coconut and the remaining 1½ teaspoon milk and add to the remaining batter, stir until just combined
9. Spoon the cherry batter into the other half of the prepared baking tin
10. Smooth the surface of the batter with a spatula, making sure batter is in each corner
11. Bake for 25-30mins until the cake is well risen, springs back when lightly touched and a
toothpick comes out clean (it should shrink away from the sides of the pan)
12. Leave to cool in the tin for a few minutes before turning out to cool thoroughly on a wire rack

Chocolate Plastique / Modelling Chocolate (From joy of baking)


Dark Chocolate Plastique
200gm /7 oz Good Quality Dark Chocolate (70% Cocoa content)
¼ cup / 60ml /2 oz Light Corn Syrup / Glucose Syrup / Golden Syrup

Directions:
1. Melt the chocolate in a double boiler or in a heatproof bowl over a pot of simmering water, stir occasionally
2. Once completely melted, remove from heat and allow to cool a bit
3. Stir in corn syrup / glucose syrup / golden syrup, it will seize up almost immediately, just keep stirring until mixed and it comes away from the side of the bowl
4. Transfer chocolate into a sealable bag, spread the chocolate out then seal the bag
5. Leave overnight or refrigerate for about 2 hours until completely firm
6. Turn out from the bag and knead on a surface dusted with powdered sugar, at first it will just break , but as you knead, it will warm up and start to become pliable
7. Knead until it’s pliable enough to roll out or mould, 5 – 10mins

Chocolate Ganache

1.  Heat 200g dark chocolate in a pan with 200ml whipping cream over gentle heat until chocolate is melted.

2.  Leave to cool a little before use.

 

To make battenberg:

1.  Cut cooled cakes in half to make long rectangular pieces.

2.  Trim pieces so they are all even

3. Stick pieces together with chocolate ganache to form battenberg pattern and ice the top and sides to stick the chocolate plastique.

4.  Cover in rolled chocolate plastique and trim ends to neaten.
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Daring Bakers Challenge April 2012: Nazooks

The Daring Bakers’ April 2012 challenge, hosted by Jason at Daily Candor, were two Armenian standards: nazook and nutmeg cake. Nazook is a layered yeasted dough pastry with a sweet filling, and nutmeg cake is a fragrant, nutty coffee-style cake.

I made the Nazook, half with the traditional vanilla filling and half with an almond meal chocolate filling.  They were both great, although I slightly preferred the chocolate (always do!).  The pastry is easy, buttery and delicious and could easily be used for a whole range of fillings, both sweet and savoury.

Nazook

approx 40 pieces

Ingredients
Pastry dough

  • 3 cups  all-purpose (plain) flour, sifted
  • 2½ teaspoons active dry yeast
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • 1 cup softened butter (room temperature)

Vanilla Filling (makes enough to fill half the dough)

  • 3/4 cup  all-purpose (plain) flour, sifted
  • 3/4 cup  sugar
  • 1/3 cup softened butter (room temperature)
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Chocolate Almond Filling (makes enough to fill the rest of the dough)

  • 3/4 cup almond meal
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1/3 cup butter softened
  • 2 teaspoon cocoa
  • pinch on salt

Wash

  • 1-2 egg yolks (for the wash; alternatively, some yogurt, egg whites, or a whole egg)

Directions:

Make the Pastry Dough
1. Place the sifted flour into a large bowl.
2. Mix in dry yeast.
3. Add the sour cream, and the softened butter.
4. Use your hands, or a standing mixer with a paddle attachment, to work it into a dough.
5. Knead for about 10 minutes, or until the dough no longer sticks to the bowl or your hands. If it remains very sticky, add some flour, a little at a time.
6. Cover the dough and refrigerate for 3-5 hours, or overnight if you like.

Make the filling
7. In a small bowl, mix the flour, sugar, and the softened butter in a medium bowl.
8. Add the vanilla extract.
9. Mix the filling until it looks like clumpy, damp sand. It should not take long. Set aside.

10.  In a separate bowl combine chocolate almond filling ingredients and set this aside too

Make the nazook
11. Preheat the oven to moderate 180 degrees C.
12. Cut the refrigerated dough into quarters.
13. Form one of the quarters into a ball. Dust your working surface with a little flour.
14. Roll out the dough into a large rectangle or oval. The dough should be thin, but not transparent.

15. Spread 1/4 of the filling mixture across the rolled-out dough in an even layer. Try to spread the filling as close as possible to the edges on the short sides, but keep some of pastry dough uncovered (1 inch/2.5 cm) along the long edges.
16. From one of the long sides, start slowly rolling the dough across. Be careful to make sure the filling stays evenly distributed. Roll all the way across until you have a long, thin loaf.

17. Pat down the loaf with your palm and fingers so that it flattens out a bit (just a bit).
18. Apply your egg yolk wash with a pastry brush.

19.  Cut into 1 inch slices and place on paper lined tray

20. Bake for about 30 minutes or until golden brown, cool and enjoy!

Nutmeg cake to follow shortly!

Momofuku Carrot Cake Truffles

As you may have notice I am obsessed with the recipes from Christina Tosi’s Milk: The Momofuku Cookbook.  In this day and age it’s not easy to find baking recipes that are totally innovative and unique.  Although it has to be said that there is nothing wrong with the classics, you can’t go far wrong with a good lemon meringue pie or sticky toffee pudding, it is nice to see somebody creating something totally new rather than trying to improve upon a traditional recipe that is often better before it was fiddled with.

I made some cake truffles before, which turned out very nicely, despite being just leftover cakes from the freezer mixed with icing, but this time I wanted to try the real deal.  I meant to take them to work for an Easter treat, but to be honest I’m not sure they’ll make it to Monday.

It’s quite a lengthy process, you really have to make three different recipes and then assemble them, but totally worth the effort.  I will also add that with the addition of a few nuts and sultanas, this carrot cake is going to be my new go to recipe.  It’s dense, wonderfully moist and carroty and make have ended my quest for the perfect carrot cake recipe.  Similarly the liquid cheesecake is probably the best I have tasted and I’ll definitely be making it again, probably with the base made from the Graham Crust from the compost cookies recipe. Although it does set quite firmly when chilled, I foresee problems with cutting and serving a slice (being liquid cheesecake after all), but I’m pretty sure presentation will be overlooked once everyone has a taste.

I used the whole cake and cheesecake recipe to make truffles, but didn’t have enough of the milk crumb so got a bit creative and covered some with the caramelized cornflakes used in the Cereal Milk Ice Cream recipe.  Then I got even more creative and tried to make my own ‘crumb’ with coconut, milk powder, and sugar.  This worked surprisingly well, and cuts through the richness of the white chocolate a bit.

The original recipe calls for a paddle attachment on the mixer, which I haven’t got, but used a normal whisk with no problems!

Carrot Cake Truffles (From Milk: The Momofuku Cookbook, by Christina Tosi)

3 cups Carrot Cake Scraps (recipe below)
2-4 tablespoons Liquid Cheesecake (recipe below)
1/2 recipe Milk Crumb finely ground in a food processor (recipe below), you’ll probably need more if you use all the cake!
80g. White Chocolate (more if using all the cake- more like 200g)

1.  Combine the crushed up cake with 2 tablespoons of the liquid cheesecake, mush it all together with hands.

2.  Add more cheesecake if needed to form a ball.  Portion out  balls of the mixture- roll them together with your hands and set them aside on a cookie sheet.

3.Melt the white chocolate and put it in a shallow bowl.

4.  Using a spoon, dip each ball of cake into the white chocolate

5.  Toss it in the milk crumb, coconut crumb or caramelized corn flakes until well coated.

6.  Chill in fridge to set the chocolate.

The truffles can be stored in an airtight container for unto a week in the fridge.
Whole cake makes about 35 truffles

Carrot Cake

113 g butter- room temp.

Milk Crumb Coated

1/2 cup packed light brown sugar
1/2 granulated sugar
2 eggs
1/4 cup  vegetable oil
1 1/4 cups flour
1 tsp. baking powder
1/4 tsp. baking soda
3/4 tsp. ground cinnamon
1 1/4 teaspoons salt
2 1/2 cups grated peeled carrots (2-3 medium sized carrots)

1.  Preheat oven to 180 degrees C.
2.  Combine the butter and sugars in the bowl and cream together with an electric mixer on a medium-high for 2 to 3 mins.

3.  Add the eggs, and mix on medium-high for 2 to 3 mins. Make sure to scrape bowl to get mix of the sides.

4.  On low speed, stream in the oil

5.  Increase the mixer speed to medium-high and mix for 4 to 6 mins, until the mixture is practically white, twice the size of your original fluffy butter/sugar mixture, with no streaks of fat.

6.  On low speed, add the flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon and salt. Mix for 45-60 seconds, just until your batter comes together all dry ingredients are mixed in.

7.  Add carrots and fold in with a spatula.

8.  Grease a 9×13 pan with cooking spray and spread the batter in  the pan.

9.  Bake for 25-30 mins. The cake will rise and puff, doubling in size, but will remain slightly buttery and dense. At 25 minutes, gently poke the edge of the cake with your finger, if it bounces back slightly and isn’t jiggly in the center, it’s done. Leave it in for 3-5 more minutes if it isn’t quite done.

Cool the cake on a wire rack (or in the freezer.)

Liquid Cheesecake

250g. Cream Cheese

Corn Flake Coated

3/4 cup Sugar
1 tablespoon cornstarch
1/2 tsp.  salt
2 tablespoons milk
1 egg

1.  Heat oven to 180 C.

2.  Put cream cheese into a  bowl and using an electric mixer, beat on medium speed for 2 mins.

3.  Add the sugar and mix for 1-2 mins.

4.  Whisk together the cornstarch and salt in a medium bowl then whisk in the milk in a slow, steady stream, then whisk in the egg until all mixed together.

5.  With the mixer on a medium low speed stream the egg mix into the cream cheese.

6.  Mix for 3 or 4 minutes, until the mixture is smooth.

7.  Line the sides and bottom of a 6×6 baking pan with plastic wrap.

8.  Pour the cheesecake batter into the pan and bake for 15 mins.  It is done when it is set on the edges but still wobbly in the center. If the edges aren’t quite set, bake for 5 min increments until it’s done- no more than 25 minutes.

9.  Cool completely to finish the baking process and allow the cheesecake to set.
Milk Crumb
1/4 cup milk powder
1/8 cup flour
1 tablespoon cornstarch
1 tablespoon sugar
1/4 tsp. salt
2 tablespoons melted butter

1/8 cup milk powder
40g white chocolate.

1.  Heat the oven to 120C.

2.  Combine 1/4 cup of milk powder with the flour, cornstarch, sugar and salt in  bowl. Toss with your hands to mix.

3.  Add the butter and toss using a spatula until the mixture comes together and forms small lumps.

4.  Spread the clusters on a baking paper lined tray and bake for 20 mins. Watch them, they burn quickly!

5.  Crush any bits that are larger than 2 cm in diameter and put the crumbs in a medium bowl.

6.  Toss in the remaining milk powder

7.  Pore melted white chocolate over the crumbs and toss until your the crumbs are all well-coated.

8.  Continue tossing them every 5 mins until the white chocolate hardens and the clusters aren’t sticky.

9.Run the dried and cooled clusters through the food processor before using them for the truffles. (I didn’t have a processor, so I used the stick blender, which didn’t make them quite as fine as they should have been)

Coconut Crumb Recipe

Coconut Crumb Coated


3/4 cup shredded coconut

1 1/2 Tbsp Butter melted

1 tsp corn flour

1Tbsp Milk powder

1/2 tsp salt

1.  Mix ingredients

2.  Bake at 180 C on a paper lined tray for about 15 mins or until coconut starts to brown slightly.

Click on link for Caramelized Corn Flake Recipe

Another Momofuku Milk Bar Hit; Compost Cookies

Are you a sweet tooth, craving cake, chocolate and cookies?  Or maybe more of a savory snacker who goes in for chips, pretzels and the like.  Which ever your snacking preference, these compost cookies from Christine Tosi’s Momofuku Milk Bar cookbook will hit the spot.  Basically you can throw in anything you like or have in the cupboard, although the recipe makes some pretty awesome suggestions that you’ll probably want to try first!

Compost Cookies (Adapted from Momofuku Milk Bar cookbook). 

  • 225 grams butter, at room temperature
  • 200 grams  granulated sugar
  • 150 grams  light brown sugar
  • 50 grams glucose (I left this out as I didn’t have it and they were still great!)
  • 1 egg
  • 2 grams  vanilla extract
  • 225 grams  flour
  • 2 grams  baking powder
  • 1 1/2 grams baking soda
  • 4 grams  salt
  • 150 grams  mini chocolate chips (I used chopped chocolate)
  • 100 grams mini butterscotch chips (I used chopped mars bar)
  • 1/4 recipe Graham Crust -see recipe below
  • 40 grams old-fashioned rolled oats
  • 5 grams ground coffee (I forgot this- didn’t matter)
  • 50 grams  potato chips
  • 50 grams  mini pretzels
  • handful sultanas
  • handful chopped hazelnuts

Directions

1.  Combine the butter, sugars and glucose in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment and cream together on medium-high for 2 to 3 minutes.

2.  Scrape down the sides of the bowl, add the egg and vanilla, and beat for 7 to 8 minutes.

3.  Reduce the speed to low and add the flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt. Mix just until the dough comes together, no longer than 1 minute. (Do not walk away from the machine during this step, or you will risk overmixing the dough.) Scrape down the sides of the bowl with a spatula.

4.  Still on low speed, add the chocolate chips, butterscotch chips, graham crust, oats, sultanas and nuts and coffee, and mix just until incorporated, about 30 seconds.

5.  Add the potato chips and pretzels, and paddle, still on low speed, until just incorporated. Be careful not to overmix or break too many of the pretzels or potato chips.

6.  Using a 2-ounce ice cream scoop (or a 1⁄3-cup measure), portion out the dough onto a parchment-lined sheet pan. Pat the tops of the cookie dough domes flat. Wrap the sheet pan tightly in plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 1 hour, or up to 1 week. Do not bake your cookies from room temperature—they will not bake properly.  (I put mine in the freezer for about an hour and they held shape well)

7.  Heat the oven to 180.

8.  Arrange the chilled dough a minimum of 4 inches apart on parchment-  Bake for 18 minutes.

9.  The cookies will puff, crackle and spread. After 15 minutes, they should be very faintly browned on the edges yet still bright yellow in the center. Give them an extra minute or so if that’s not the case.

10.  Cool the cookies completely on the sheet pans before transferring to a plate or an airtight container for storage. At room temp, cookies will keep fresh for 5 days; in the freezer, they will keep for 1 month.

Spot the chip!

Graham Crust Recipe

Ingredients

  • 190 grams graham cracker crumbs (I used digestives)
  • 20 grams  milk powder
  • 25 grams  sugar
  • 3 grams salt
  • 55 grams butter, melted, or as needed
  • 55 grams heavy cream

Directions

1.  Toss the graham crumbs, milk powder, sugar and salt with your hands in a medium bowl to evenly distribute your dry ingredients.

2.  Whisk the butter and heavy cream together. Add to the dry ingredients and toss again to evenly distribute. The butter will act as a glue, adhering to the dry ingredients and turning the mixture into a bunch of small clusters. The mixture should hold its shape if squeezed tightly in the palm of your hand. If it is not moist enough to do so, melt an additional 14 to 25 grams (1 to 1 1/2 tablespoons) butter and mix it in.

3.  Eat immediately, or deploy as directed in a recipe. The crust is easiest to mold just after mixing. Stored in an airtight container, graham crust will keep fresh for 1 week at room temperature or for 1 month in the fridge or freezer.

This would make an awesome cheesecake crust too!

Daring Bakers March Challenge – Dutch Crunch Bread

Sara and Erica of Baking JDs were our March 2012 Daring Baker hostesses! Sara & Erica challenged us to make Dutch Crunch bread, a delicious sandwich bread with a unique, crunchy topping. Sara and Erica also challenged us to create a one of a kind sandwich with our bread!

This was a joint effort, I left the bread making to breadhead (always better, and I’ve not no patience for all the waiting and kneading), and I made the crunch topping.  We used Dan Lepards Simple Milk Loaf to make rolls, and the dutch crunch made them lovely and crusty.  The oven even decided to kick in and make them nice and crisp (perhaps a little too crisp towards the back!).

Our sandwich was whatever was in the cupboard, so went with a classic combo of tuna, mayo, avocado and tomato.  Tasty dinner!

Nice Buns!

 

Cheese, chorizo and roasted pepper sandwich

 

 

Tuna, Mayo tomato and avocado sandwich

 

 

Dutch Crunch Topping (Daring Bakers)

Servings: This recipe should make sufficient topping for two 9×5 loaves (23cmx13cm) or 12 rolls.

Ingredients

2 tablespoons (2 packets) (30 ml) (15 gm/½ oz) active dry yeast
1 cup (240 ml) warm water (105-115º F) (41-46°C)
2 tablespoons (30 ml) (30 gm/1 oz) sugar
2 tablespoons (30 ml) vegetable oil
½ teaspoon (2½ ml) (3 gm) salt
1½ cups (360 ml) (240 gm/8½ oz) rice flour (white or brown; NOT sweet or glutinous rice flour) (increase by 1 cup or more for home-made rice flour)

Directions:

1. Combine all ingredients in a large bowl and beat with a whisk; beat hard to combine. The consistency should be like stiff royal icing – spreadable, but not too runny. If you pull some up with your whisk, as shown below, it should drip off slowly. Add more water or rice flour as necessary. Let stand 15 minutes.

2. Coat the top of each loaf or roll with a thick layer of topping. We tried coating it with a brush but it worked better just to use fingers or a spoon and kind of spread it around. You should err on the side of applying too much topping – a thin layer will not crack properly.
3. Let stand, uncovered, for any additional time your recipe recommends. With the Soft White Roll, you can place the rolls directly into the oven after applying the topping. With the Brown Rice Bread, the loaves should stand for 20 minutes with the topping before baking.
4. When baking, place pans on a rack in the center of the oven and bake your bread as you ordinarily would. The Dutch Crunch topping should crack and turn a nice golden-brown color.